Monday, March 22, 2010

Look Up, Look Down

How many times have I walked past this spot and never noticed it before? It's only a few blocks from my house, next to a friends house, on a route we walk on many evenings. To be fair until recently our walks have been in the dark, so that gives me one excuse for not spotting it. Tonight I looked up and saw movement. An anemometer is spinning briskly atop a light pole. (I didn't know it was an anemometer, a google search found me a better name than "wind thingy".) The photo was taken  this evening. I let photoshop adjust the curves and it came out looking like early afternoon.
 Anemometer
F/4.5 • 1/60 • ISO-800 • Handheld

Inspired by a post on Stayton Daily Photo, I was looking for something specific on our walk last week. Several sidewalks along our route are dated in the 1940's. At least I assume it's a date. We found three on our route; one is included here.
Sidewalk Date?
f/4 • 1/160 • ISO-100 • Handheld

10 comments:

  1. I like wind thingy better than anemometer. Do you happen to know who put it there? I'm always curious about the why and the who. It's interesting that it's there.

    Do you ever do curves manually? Just curious. :)

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  2. lol-the low tech name I guess.
    I don't know anything about it yet, but it's near a friends house so I'm going to ask them about it. I thought it odd that it's in a residential area. I'm quite curious about it.

    Yes I often do curves manually, or in combination with photoshop's settings. Sometimes I just like to see what PS suggests. It can come up with some interesting results at times.

    Typical workflow on an average image is: adjust curves and maybe levels, color corrections if needed, adjust contrast/brightness if it improves the image, and unsharp mask.

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  3. We have similar workflow. I also use "highlights & shadows" if it needs it. The other night I used "burning" for the first time. That's pretty neat how it works. I also use the "healing brush" to remove power lines and other unwanted stuff. PS is just amazing!

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  4. BlueKat:

    I'm not a PS user other than for contrast control. I have the G10 and have not even used RAW nor have I installed the Canon software. Also for my Nikon I also have Capture NX, but hardly use it. I need to come down and peek over your shoulder to get some pointers. I am from the old school of film photography where images should not be manipulated other than burning and dodging which I loosely interpret as "contrast control".

    bob
    bobskoot: wet coast scootin

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  5. Hi Mike
    I don't think I've used highlight/shadows or the healing brush. I'll have to check it out now. For powerlines and such, I usually use the clone tool. I think I use that more at work, than for myself. It's a pretty powerful program that's for sure.

    Hi Bobskoot,
    I think the difference is you have learned to master the camera. I've been happy to just get by with a bare minimum of understanding, then I try to recover in PS...or just turn it into something "artistic".

    I've often wondered if any of the tools in photoshop corelate with film and darkroom tools. I did photography back in high school, but all we did was film/print developing. No special effects or tricks.

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  6. Love this post Kari! It reminds me a little of a post I did a few years ago that you might enjoy.
    here it is

    http://sunnysideup-eve.blogspot.com/2008/11/eves-fable.html

    Always remember to look up and look down!!! Look all around!

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  7. Eve/Kari:

    That's what I am always doing. Scanning in all directions looking for a different point of view. Not unlike riding. Shadows change, lighting changes. I find photos are more dramatic that are backlit, but many don't know how to use fill flash. And sensors cannot capture the full dynamic range of our eyesight. Look into HDR photos, where you are "blending" light values to arrive at a greater dynamic range than can be handled by film, or image sensors.

    bob
    bobskoot: wet coast scootin

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  8. Hi Eve,
    Thanks for the link, I'll go do some reading! :)

    Hi Bobskoot

    I love some of the hdr photos I've seen. I've tried photoshop's hdr feature a couple times with limited success thus far. I like to do blends using masks/layers. I like the direct, hand's on control I get with blending. It kind of satisfies that "creative" itch I get.

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  9. Kari:

    an excellent source of info is Luminous landscapes. look for tutorials or essays

    here is one on blended exposures

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/blended_exposures.shtml

    lots of reading in that site

    bob
    bobskoot: wet coast scootin

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  10. Thanks for the link Bobskoot! :)

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